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Kulak Burun Bogaz Ihtis Derg. 2005;14(1-2):18-24.

[The prevalence of snoring in adult population].

[Article in Turkish]

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology, Medicine Faculty of Pamukkale University, Denizli, Turkey. cokara@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of habitual snoring in adult population and the relationship between habitual snoring and accompanying factors.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A cross-sectional, epidemiological study was conducted to evaluate snoring and accompanying factors. Data of 1245 persons (629 females, 616 males; mean age 45.0+/-12.2) were evaluated. A questionnaire was administered to draw information on their sociodemographic data, the incidence of snoring, the presence of witnessed apnea during sleep, the severity of snoring and its changes depending on the body position, their willingness to receive treatment for snoring, the presence of alcohol or cigarette consumption, and hypertension and coronary disease. Height and weight measurements were performed to calculate body mass index. The results were evaluated using the chi-square test and a multiple regression analysis.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of habitual snoring was 8.9% in females and 29.5% in males. Multivariate analyses showed that male sex, age over 40 years, obesity, smoking, and the use of alcohol were significant risk factors for habitual snoring. Hypertension and coronary heart disease were statistically more common in individuals with habitual snoring. The severity of snoring was high enough in 2.1% of females and in 9.4% of males to force their roommates to leave the room, making 1.1% of females and 3.4% of males to show willingness to receive medical attention.

CONCLUSION:

Habitual snoring is a frequent complaint in our country. Inquiry into the presence of habitual snoring is necessary in adults and patients should be subjected to a detailed examination for respiratory disorders during sleep.

PMID:
16227718
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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