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World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Sep 21;11(35):5517-20.

Acupuncture therapy for experimental stomach ulcer and c-Fos expression in rats.

Author information

1
Neuroinformatics Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China.

Abstract

AIM:

To determine the role of acupuncture therapy in treating experimental gastric ulcer in rats.

METHODS:

Twenty-eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (pre-acupuncture group; acupuncture group; paradistance-acupuncture group; and control group), and pre-acupuncture, paradistance-acupuncture, and control groups received 5 muL acetic acid (200 mL/L HAc) injection after a same course of electroacupuncture (EA) treatment (4 Hz, 0.6 mA, 0.45 ms, 45 min for 4 d). The rats in these three groups recovered within 4 d. The acupuncture group received EA therapy for 4 d, after HAc injection. The stomach was dissected to compare the pathological structures of ulcer. Also c-Fos activation in the nuclei of solitary tract (NTS) was observed under microscope after regular immunohistochemistry staining of brain stem sections.

RESULTS:

The number of ulcers was different among the four groups, especially between control group and paradistance-acupuncture group or pre-acupuncture group. In the latter group, the number of ulcers was much less. The gastric ulcer area was consistent with the histopathological results, indicating that pre-acupuncture had an obvious therapeutic effect on gastric ulcers. Acupuncture had a very modest effect and paradistance-acupuncture had no effect on gastric ulcers. No therapeutic effect was found in the control group. Fos-Li neurons in NTS induced by noxious gastric ulcer showed a significant difference between pre-acupuncture and control groups.

CONCLUSION:

Acupuncture before ulceration can obviously alleviate ulcer. The production of c-Fos proves that the vagus nerve mediates the induction of c-Fos in nuclei of solitary tract following experimental ulceration, suggesting that parasympathetic afferents promote the process of noxious visceral stimulation.

PMID:
16222746
PMCID:
PMC4320363
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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