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Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Jun;110(3):386-414. Epub 2005 Oct 10.

Endothelin receptor antagonists.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Physiology (CP-604), Free University Brussels, Erasmus Campus, Lennik Road 808, B-1070 Brussels, Edmonton, Canada.

Abstract

Endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been developed to block the effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in a variety of cardiovascular conditions. ET-1 is a powerful vasoconstrictor with mitogenic or co-mitogenic properties, which acts through the stimulation of 2 subtypes of receptors [endothelin receptor subtype A (ETA) and endothelin receptor subtype B (ETB) receptors]. Endogenous ET-1 is involved in a variety of conditions including systemic and pulmonary hypertension (PH), congestive heart failure (CHF), vascular remodeling (restenosis, atherosclerosis), renal failure, cancer, and cerebrovascular disease. The first dual ETA/ETB receptor blocker, bosentan, has already been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Trials of endothelin receptor antagonists in heart failure have been completed with mixed results so far. Studies are ongoing on the effects of selective ETA antagonists or dual ETA/ETB antagonists in lung fibrosis, cancer, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. While non-peptidic ET-1 receptor antagonists suitable for oral intake with excellent bioavailability have become available, proven efficacy is limited to pulmonary hypertension, but it is possible that these agents might find a place in the treatment of several cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases in the coming future.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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