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J Neurol Sci. 2006 Jan 15;240(1-2):7-14. Epub 2005 Oct 5.

Clinical and radiographic subtypes of vascular cognitive impairment in a clinic-based cohort study.

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1
Dalhousie University, Canada. kenneth.rockwood@dal.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

There is a need for empirical studies to define criteria for vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) subtypes. In this paper, we report the predictive validity of a subtype classification scheme based on clinical and radiographic features.

METHODS:

Nine Canadian memory clinics participated in the Consortium to Investigate Vascular Impairment of Cognition. This cohort consisted of 1347 patients, of whom 324 had VCI, and was followed for up to 30 months.

RESULTS:

Clinical and neuroimaging features defined three subtypes: vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia, (n=97), vascular dementia (n=101) and mixed neurodegenerative/vascular dementia (n=126). Any ischemic lesion on neuroimaging increased the odds (odds ratio=9.31; 95% confidence interval 6.46, 13.39) of a VCI diagnosis. No VCI subtype, however, was associated with a specific neuroimaging abnormality. Compared to those with no cognitive impairment, patients with each VCI subtype had higher rates of death and institutionalization (hazard ratio for combined adverse events=6.08, p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Both clinical features and radiographic features help establish a diagnosis of VCI. The outcomes of VCI subtypes, however, are more strongly associated with clinical features than with radiographic ones.

PMID:
16212979
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2005.08.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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