Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Cardiol. 2005 Oct 20;105(1):40-5.

Chinese herbs Danshen and Gegen modulate key early atherogenic events in vitro.

Author information

1
Heart Research Institute, 145 Missenden Road, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. d.sieveking@hri.org.au

Abstract

Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza) and Gegen (Radix puerariae) are two herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine, most commonly for their putative cardioprotective and anti-atherosclerotic effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of a preparation of these herbs on two key processes in the early stages of atherosclerosis; macrophage lipid loading and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Human monocyte derived macrophages (HMDMs) were treated with 0.1-1.0 mg/ml of the herbal mixture in aqueous buffers and loaded with acetylated LDL (AcLDL) (50 microg/ml) for 72 h, and analyzed for cholesterol (C) and cholesteryl esters (CE), via HPLC. Human endothelial cell monolayers were also treated with 0.1-1.0 mg/ml of the herbal mixture and monocyte adhesion measured. Cell adhesion molecules E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were assessed via ELISA. Compared to control conditions, the herbal mixture induced a significant dose-related decrease in the total cholesterol (free and esterified) in the HMDMs (p<0.001 by ANOVA). By contrast, the herbs also induced an increase in ICAM-1 expression (p<0.001) and monocyte adhesion at higher concentrations (p<0.05). In conclusion, treatment of cells with this preparation of Danshen and Gegen, a commonly used Chinese health supplement, results in a dose-related suppression of AcLDL uptake by human macrophages, and an increase in the level of ICAM-1 expression and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. These herbs therefore show the ability to modulate key early events in atherosclerosis.

PMID:
16207543
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijcard.2004.10.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center