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Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2006 Jun;17(4):352-5. Epub 2005 Oct 5.

Effects of pregnancy and child birth on urinary symptoms and urodynamics in women with multiple sclerosis.

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1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Rue Henri Le Guillou, 35 033, Rennes Cedex, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our objective was to study the impact of pregnancy and delivery on vesicourethral disorders in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).

DESIGN AND SETTING:

We performed a retrospective chart review of records of women diagnosed with MS who were referred to the clinic.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 102 women with MS (mean age of 44.7 +/- 11.4 years at the time of the study and mean age of 30.0 +/- 9.6 years at the onset of MS) participated in the study. The mean duration of disease was 15 +/- 10 years. The mean Expanded Disability Status Scale score was 5.4 +/- 1.8.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

For each patient, demographic data, disease characteristics, urological and obstetrical history and urodynamic data were collected. Urinary disorders were classified as irritative (urinary urgency and frequency) or as obstructive (hesitancy of micturition, reduced or interrupted urinary stream and sensation of incomplete bladder emptying). Urodynamic study consisted of cystometry with continuous recording of urethral sphincter electromyography in 77 (76%) cases. Intravesical and intraurethral pressures were recorded. Bladder dysfunctions were classified into neurogenic detrusor overactivity or detrusor underactivity.

RESULTS:

Pregnancies and deliveries did not influence symptoms. Moreover, the only statistical difference from a urodynamic point of view was a decrease in maximal urethral closure pressure.

CONCLUSION:

No interaction between pregnancy, delivery and urinary symptoms was found in this study. The effects of pregnancy and delivery seemed to be the same in women with MS and in healthy women, with a tendency towards a decrease in urethral pressure in women with MS.

PMID:
16205846
DOI:
10.1007/s00192-005-0012-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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