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J Invasive Cardiol. 2005 Oct;17(10):512-7.

Early discharge is feasible following primary percutaneous coronary intervention with transradial stent implantation under platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockade. Results of the AGGRASTENT Trial.

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1
Amsterdam Department of Interventional Cardiology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation demonstrated to be superior to both PCI with balloon angioplasty and to thrombolysis for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The use of glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa blockers in this setting may be beneficial. However, GP IIb-IIIa receptor blocker treatment is frequently accompanied by femoral entry site-related bleeding complications, resulting in additional morbidity and prolonged hospitalization. These complications are minimized by using the transradial approach (TRA).

METHODS:

This study prospectively explored the feasibility of early discharge (within 4 days) following primary PCI with transradial stent implantation under GP IIb-IIIa blockade with tirofiban in the setting of STEMI. One-hundred patients with STEMI eligible for PCI were included.

RESULTS:

Of these 100 patients, 62% received treatment according to the protocol, e.g., TRA, successful PCI with stent implantation, full-dose GP IIb/IIIa receptor blocker infusion and early discharge. The PCI was successful in 95%. Early discharge was achieved in 75 patients of the total study population. Major adverse cardiac and cerebral events (MACCE) did not occur in the early discharge group, with a 1-year event-free survival rate of 91%. The combined MACCE rates in the total study population at 1, 6, and 12 months were 8%, 15% and 20%, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Early discharge is feasible following primary PCI with stent implantation via the radial artery under GP IIb-IIIa blockade for STEMI, however a larger study is needed to prove the efficacy of this strategy.

PMID:
16204742
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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