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Neurol Res. 2005;27 Suppl 1:S129-35.

Partial aortic obstruction improves cerebral perfusion and clinical symptoms in patients with symptomatic vasospasm.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Endovascular Neurosurgery and Interventional Neuroradiology, ENERI Clínica Médica Belgrano Buenos Aires, Argentina. plylyk@lylyk.com.ar

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Stroke studies in animals showed that aortic obstruction increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduces infarct size. In this study we evaluate the safety and efficacy of a device providing partial and transitory aortic obstruction.

METHODS:

We report the results in 24 selected patients with symptomatic vasospasm by aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage treated by partial and transitory aortic obstruction with a novel device (NeuroFlo, CoAxia, MN). Aneurysms were secured by coils prior to the procedure. We studied the adverse effects related to the aorta-obstructing device, and changes in CBF and neurological outcome.

RESULTS:

Mean flow velocity increased in both middle cerebral arteries over 15%, and the score in the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale decreased >or=2 point in 20 patients (83%). During the procedure, three patients developed symptoms that were controlled. At 30 days follow-up, three patients had 6 points (unrelated death), three had 3 points, six had 1 point, and 12 had 0 points, in the modified Rankin scale.

DISCUSSION:

Partial aortic obstruction was safe, the cerebral blood flow increased without inducing significant hypertension and the neurological defects improved in most of the patients. Efficacy with a better level of evidence will be determined by a randomized study.

PMID:
16197838
DOI:
10.1179/016164105X35512
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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