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Brain Inj. 2005 Aug 20;19(9):699-710.

Attentional and processing skills following traumatic brain injury in early childhood.

Author information

1
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Department of Psychology, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, and University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. vicki.anderson@rch.org.au

Abstract

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

Attentional deficits are common following TBI in adults. This study examined whether these skills are also vulnerable following early childhood injury, when such skills are rapidly developing.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

This study investigated attention 30 months post-TBI in pre-schoolers (n=56) and age-matched controls (n=26). TBI children were divided into mild, moderate and severe injury groups.

METHODS AND PROCEDURE:

Pre-injury data were collected at time of injury. Assessment of attention included the Continuous Performance Test, Wechsler Intelligence Scale and Personality Inventory for Children.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS:

Severe TBI was associated with reduced accuracy and slowed processing, particularly on complex motor responses. Sustained attention was more intact. Parental reports indicate internalized behavioural problems and somatic complaints.

CONCLUSIONS:

Young children with severe TBI are at risk for severe, persisting attentional impairments. Children with mild and moderate TBI show better outcome, with pre-injury behaviour and age also predictive of attentional skills at 30 months post-injury.

PMID:
16195184
DOI:
10.1080/02699050400025281
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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