Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nature. 2005 Sep 29;437(7059):640-7.

Interfaces and the driving force of hydrophobic assembly.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. chandler@cchem.berkeley.edu

Abstract

The hydrophobic effect--the tendency for oil and water to segregate--is important in diverse phenomena, from the cleaning of laundry, to the creation of micro-emulsions to make new materials, to the assembly of proteins into functional complexes. This effect is multifaceted depending on whether hydrophobic molecules are individually hydrated or driven to assemble into larger structures. Despite the basic principles underlying the hydrophobic effect being qualitatively well understood, only recently have theoretical developments begun to explain and quantify many features of this ubiquitous phenomenon.

PMID:
16193038
DOI:
10.1038/nature04162
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center