Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Neurosci. 2005 Sep 28;25(39):8889-97.

Depression of synaptic transmission by vascular endothelial growth factor in adult rat hippocampus and evidence for increased efficacy after chronic seizures.

Author information

  • 1Center for Neural Recovery and Rehabilitation Research, Helen Hayes Hospital, West Haverstraw, New York 10993, USA. mccloskeyd@helenhayeshosp.org

Abstract

In addition to its potent effects on vasculature, it has become clear that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has effects on both neurons and glia, and recent studies suggest that it can be neuroprotective. To determine potential mechanisms underlying this neuroprotection, recombinant human VEGF was bath applied to adult rat hippocampal slices, and both extracellular and intracellular recordings were used to examine intrinsic properties and synaptic responses of hippocampal principal neurons. Initial studies in area CA1 showed that VEGF significantly reduced the amplitude of responses elicited by Schaffer collateral stimulation, without influencing membrane properties. Similar effects occurred in CA3 pyramidal cells and dentate gyrus granule cells when their major glutamatergic afferents were stimulated. Because VEGF expression is increased after seizures, effects of VEGF were also examined in rats with recurrent spontaneous seizures. VEGF reduced spontaneous discharges in slices from these rats but had surprisingly little effect on epileptiform discharges produced by disinhibition of slices from control rats. These results demonstrate a previously unknown effect of VEGF on neuronal activity and also demonstrate a remarkable potency in the epileptic brain. Based on this, we suggest that VEGF or VEGF-related targets could provide useful endpoints to direct novel therapeutic strategies for epilepsy.

PMID:
16192378
PMCID:
PMC1415170
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2577-05.2005
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center