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Emotion. 2005 Sep;5(3):251-7.

Can children recognize pride?

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8686, USA. jltracy@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

Recent research has shown that pride, like the "basic" emotions of anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise, has a distinct, nonverbal expression that can be recognized by adults (J. L. Tracy & R. W. Robins, 2004b). In 2 experiments, the authors examined whether young children can identify the pride expression and distinguish it from expressions of happiness and surprise. Results suggest that (a) children can recognize pride at above-chance levels by age 4 years; (b) children recognize pride as well as they recognize happiness; (c) pride recognition, like happiness and surprise recognition, improves from age 3 to 7 years; and (d) children's ability to recognize pride cannot be accounted for by the use of a process of elimination (i.e., an exclusion rule) to identify an unknown entity. These findings have implications for the development of emotion recognition and children's ability to perceive and communicate pride.

PMID:
16187861
DOI:
10.1037/1528-3542.5.3.251
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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