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Spinal Cord. 2006 May;44(5):287-96.

Body weight-supported treadmill training in chronic incomplete spinal cord injury: a pilot study evaluating functional health status and quality of life.

Author information

1
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

A controlled single-case design: A1 (baseline: 6 weeks), B (intervention: 12 weeks of treadmill training (TT), maximally five times a week/30 min a day), A2 (wash-out: 6 weeks), follow-up measurement: 6 months.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the effects of TT on functional health status (FHS) and quality of life (QoL) in subjects with a chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (ISCI).

SETTING:

Rehabilitation Department, University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands.

METHODS:

Three male subjects with a stable (>48 months postinjury) ISCI, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) class C (n=2) and D (n=1). Performance-based walking, subject's perception concerning quality of life (SEIQoL) and activities of daily living Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM).

RESULTS:

The results of the three subjects were variable. Changes in QoL were relatively small and diverse. After 6 months' follow-up, QoL was unchanged in subjects 1 and 2, and improved in subject 3. In subject 2, performance of activities of daily living (ADL) was significantly improved, consistent with his perception of improvement (P<0.05), and this improvement was sustained throughout the follow-up period. Walking ability improved in subject 3 (P<0.05) but performance of other activities remained stable. Performance of ADL decreased slightly in subject 1 whereas his walking speed and Get up and Go performance improved (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study demonstrates positive effects of TT on FHS. A randomised clinical trial should be executed before definite conclusions about the effect of TT on FHS and QoL can be drawn.

SPONSORSHIP:

KF Hein Foundation and Rehabilitation Centre De Hoogstraat Scientific Foundation.

PMID:
16186857
DOI:
10.1038/sj.sc.3101841
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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