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Transplant Proc. 2005 Jul-Aug;37(6):2636-7.

New-onset diabetes after liver transplantation.

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1
Centro Trapianti di Fegato-Azienda Ospedaliera S. Giovanni Battista di Torino, Torino, Italy.

Abstract

AIM:

The impact of new-onset diabetes (NOD) posttransplantation has been underestimated in the past. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of diabetes after liver transplantation.

METHODS:

We retrospectively analyzed the incidence of NOD in 899 patients transplanted in our center. According to International Consensus 2003 Guidelines, criteria for diagnosis of diabetes were: fasting plasma glucose > or =126 mg/dL, symptoms of diabetes plus casual plasma glucose concentrations > or =200 mg/dL, and 2-hour plasma glucose levels > or =200 mg/dL during an oral glucose tolerance test. We considered only patients with follow-up over 10 months. We evaluated the risk factors correlated with NOD (age, hepatitis C virus [HCV] positivity, tacrolimus vs cyclosporine, steatosic graft), and the outcomes of diabetic patient and their grafts.

RESULTS:

The incidence of NOD was 10.8% (90/830 patients). Sixty nine patients were diabetic before transplantation. Recipient age >45 years (14.7% vs 6.8%, P = .002, OR = 2.4) and HCV positivity (15.5% vs 7.8%, P = .001, OR = 2.2) significantly correlated with NOD. Multivariate analysis confirmed these variables to be independently associated with diabetic risk. Tacrolimus was associated with an increased risk of NOD (16.2% in HCV-negative patients, 25% in HCV-positive patients), but this difference was not statistically significant. Steatotic grafts (>10%) were associated with an increased risk of NOD (28.6% vs 10%, P = .001, OR = 3.6). The outcome of patients and grafts in the group of diabetic patients was not significantly different from all other patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of NOD was more relevant in patients older than 45 years and/or HCV-positive. A steatotic graft was an important risk factor, and the match with high-risk patients should be avoided.

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