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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2005 Sep;86(9):1824-9.

Resistance training improves gait kinematics in persons with multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effects of an 8-week lower-body resistance-training program on walking mechanics in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS).

DESIGN:

Repeated-measures design, evaluating gait kinematics before and after an 8-week progressive resistance-training intervention.

SETTING:

Biomechanics laboratory and fitness center (with conventional, commercially available resistance-training equipment).

PARTICIPANTS:

Eight ambulatory subjects with MS (age, 46.0+/-11.5 y) with Expanded Disability Status Scale scores ranging from 2.5 to 5.5.

INTERVENTION:

An 8-week progressive resistance-training program.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Kinematic gait parameters including knee range of motion, duration of stance, swing, and double-support phases in seconds and as percentages of the stride time, percentage of stride time spent in stance, swing, and double-support phases, step length, foot angle, stride length, velocity, step width, and toe clearance for both the more affected and less affected lower limbs. Isometric strength, 3-minute stepping, fatigue, and self-reported disability were also measured.

RESULTS:

After 2 months of resistance training, there were significant increases (P<.05) in percentage of stride time in the swing phase, step length, stride length, and foot angle; and significant decreases (P<.05) in percentage of stride time in the stance and double-support phases, duration of the double-support phase, and toe clearance. Isometric leg strength improved (P<.05) in 2 of the 4 muscle groups tested. Fatigue indices decreased (P=.04), whereas self-reported disability tended to decrease (P=.07) following the training program. Three-minute stepping increased by 8.7%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Resistance training may be an effective intervention strategy for improving walking and functional ability in moderately disabled persons with MS.

PMID:
16181949
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2005.04.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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