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Physiol Behav. 2006 Jan 30;87(1):39-44. Epub 2005 Sep 21.

Effects of selective estrogen receptor agonists on food intake and body weight gain in rats.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Center for the Study of Sex Differences in Health, Aging, and Disease, Georgetown University, 4000 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC 20057, USA. roeschd@georgetown.edu

Abstract

Ovariectomized (OVX) rats eat more and gain weight more rapidly than sham-operated (SO) rats and estradiol (E(2)) treatment attenuates food intake and body weight gain in OVX rats. Studies were designed to test the hypothesis that the alpha subtype of the estrogen receptor (ERalpha) mediates the attenuating effects of E(2) on food intake and body weight gain while the beta subtype (ERbeta) mediates opposing actions that lead to increased food intake and body weight gain. Female rats were SO or OVX and treated daily with vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO) or E(2) (10 microg/day), or the ERalpha-selective agonist, 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (PPT, 0.5 mg/day), or the ERbeta-selective agonist, 2,3-bis(4-hyroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN, 0.5 mg/day) for 14 days. Total food intake was significantly reduced by E(2) and PPT, but not DPN. Total body weight gain was significantly increased in OVX rats compared to SO rats and treatment with E(2) or PPT, but not DPN, significantly decreased total body weight gain to levels that were not significantly different from SO rats. A dose-response study of PPT indicated that at 0.25 mg/day, PPT significantly reduced total 21-day food intake and body weight gain and, at 0.13 and 0.06 mg/day, PPT significantly reduced total body weight gain compared to OVX rats without significantly reducing total food intake. A dose-response study of DPN indicated that none of the three doses of DPN significantly altered total 21-day food intake or total body weight gain. These results suggest ERalpha mediates the attenuating effects of estrogens on food intake and body weight gain while ERbeta has no effect on these variables.

PMID:
16181647
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2005.08.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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