Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Infect. 2006 May;52(5):346-53. Epub 2005 Sep 19.

Molecular characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Łódź, Poland: analysis by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism and double-repetitive-element PCR.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics of Microorganisms, University of Łódź, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Łódź, Poland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of the present study was to characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in the area of Łódź, Poland, from 1996 to 2000.

METHODS:

Two hundred sixty three isolates from 250 patients with tuberculosis were analysed by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and the double-repetitive-element PCR (DRE-PCR) method when indicated.

RESULTS:

The isolates were found to show a great heterogeneity and only 52 strains (20.8%) occurred in 20 clusters of 2-5 identical clones. Despite this diversity of IS6110 RFLP patterns, a computer analysis of similarities revealed a high level of relatedness (at least 90%) among 38.4% of different patterns. Most of the patients with clustered strains showed no apparent epidemiologic links with other patients whose strains had the same pattern. Utilisation of the DRE-PCR analysis as an additional typing test allowed to differentiate M. tuberculosis strains with a discriminating capacity similar to that of the IS6110 RFLP. Also, DRE-PCR differentiated nine strains that were indistinguishable by the RFLP analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Both methods used for the molecular characterization of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates showed similar discriminating ability. DRE-PCR analysis proved a simple, rapid and cost-effective adjunct to the IS6110 RFLP reference method. It could be applied as a screening test, thus, reducing the number of isolates that need further subtyping with the IS6110 RFLP to those initially clustered.

PMID:
16176836
DOI:
10.1016/j.jinf.2005.07.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center