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Am J Vet Res. 2005 Aug;66(8):1356-63.

Effects of preoperative administration of carprofen on renal function and hemostasis in dogs undergoing surgery for fracture repair.

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1
Small Animal Clinic, School of Veterinary Medicine, Bischofsholer Damm 15, D-30173 Hannover, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate effects of preoperative administration of carprofen on renal function and hemostasis in dogs undergoing general anesthesia for fracture repair.

ANIMALS:

26 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURE:

Anesthesia was induced with levomethadone, diazepam, and propofol and maintained by administration of isoflurane in oxygen-nitrous oxide. Carprofen (4 mg/kg, SC) was administered 1 hour before induction to 13 dogs (group 1) and after extubation to the other 13 dogs (group 2). All dogs also received carprofen (4 mg/kg, SC, q 24 h) for the first 4 days after surgery. Renal function (glomerular filtration rate [GFR], urinary protein-to-urinary creatinine ratio [UP:UC], and results of urinalysis and biochemical analysis of plasma), hemostatic variables (bleeding time, platelet aggregation, prothrombin time [PT], activated partial thromboplastin time [APTT], and platelet count), and Hct were assessed before and at various time points after surgery.

RESULTS:

Analysis of results for renal function tests, most of the hemostatic and plasma biochemical variables, and Hct did not reveal significant differences between treatment groups. Values for GFR, UP:UC, PT, APTT, and platelet aggregation were outside reference ranges in many dogs before surgery and during the first 6 hours after surgery. In most dogs, these trauma-induced pathologic changes returned to within reference ranges during the 4-day period after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Carprofen did not cause clinically relevant adverse effects in dogs anesthetized for fracture repair after 5 days of treatment, even when it was administered before surgery or given to patients with trauma-induced alterations in renal function or hemostasis.

PMID:
16173478
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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