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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Dec 15;172(12):1510-6. Epub 2005 Sep 15.

Lung mechanics and dyspnea during exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Clinical Sciences Centre, University Hospital Aintree, Longmoor Lane, Liverpool L9 7AL, UK.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease commonly causes hospitalization. The change in lung mechanics during exacerbation and its relationship to symptoms in spontaneously breathing individuals has not been described.

OBJECTIVE:

We hypothesized that changes in both airflow and lung volumes would occur during an exacerbation, but that only volume change would relate to symptomatic improvement.

METHODS:

Lung mechanics and resting dyspnea were recorded in 22 hospitalized patients during recovery from exacerbation.

MEASUREMENTS:

Spirometry, inspiratory capacity, respiratory system resistance and reactance, tidal breathing patterns, and expiratory flow limitation were recorded after nebulized bronchodilator therapy on the first 3 d after admission, at discharge, and 6 wk postadmission (Day 42). Prebronchodilator measurements were taken on Day 2, at discharge, and on Day 42.

MAIN RESULTS:

Postbronchodilator inspiratory capacity increased 0.23 +/- 0.07 L by discharge and 0.42 +/- 0.1 L by Day 42, FEV1 rose 0.09 +/- 0.04 and 0.2 +/- 0.05 L at discharge and Day 42, respectively, and FVC increased 0.21 +/- 0.08 and 0.47 +/- 0.09 L at discharge and Day 42 (all p < 0.05). Consistent reduction in dyspnea was seen as the exacerbation resolved. Respiratory system resistance, FEV1/FVC, and expiratory flow limitation were unchanged throughout, indicating that changes in lung volume rather than airflow resistance predominated.

CONCLUSIONS:

Improvement in operating lung volumes is the principal change seen as a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation resolves and increase in inspiratory capacity is a useful guide to a reduction in dyspnea.

PMID:
16166620
DOI:
10.1164/rccm.200504-595OC
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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