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Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;13(9):787-94.

Caregiver self-efficacy, ethnicity, and kinship differences in dementia caregivers.

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1
Older Adult and Family Center, VA Medical Center and Stanford University School of Medicine, Mail Code 182C/MP, 795 Willow Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The authors sought to determine the effect of kinship status (daughters versus wives) and ethnicity (Hispanic/Latino versus Caucasian) on self-efficacy to perform tasks relevant to caregiving in a sample of family caregivers for people with memory problems.

METHODS:

Baseline data were collected from 238 female caregivers who participated in an intervention program. Ethnic and kin relationship groups were compared on measures of caregiver self-efficacy, acculturation within the Hispanic/Latino sample, and the relationship of self-efficacy to key outcome variables.

RESULTS:

Hispanics/Latinos reported higher self-efficacy on two of three self-efficacy subscales (Responding to Disruptive Behaviors and Controlling Negative Thoughts About Caregiving). Daughters reported higher self-efficacy on all three self-efficacy scales. Among Hispanics/Latinos, acculturation did not relate strongly to self-efficacy. Caucasian and spousal caregivers appeared to make more generalized appraisals about caregiving.

CONCLUSION:

Higher self-efficacy among Hispanic/Latino caregivers may relate to cultural values about caregiving and/or ethnic differences in appraisal. Wives may be more at risk for low self-efficacy, which may relate to greater role frustration and distress. This study highlights the heterogeneity among caregivers in their experience of caregiving.

PMID:
16166408
DOI:
10.1176/appi.ajgp.13.9.787
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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