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J Dairy Sci. 2005 Oct;88(10):3650-4.

Effects of lyophilized colostrum and different colostrum feeding regimens on passive transfer of immunoglobulin g in Majorera goat kids.

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1
Department of Animal Science, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria University, Arucas 35416, Spain.

Abstract

Three experiments were conducted including 180 Majorera kids. In the first experiment, the effect of use of lyophilized colostrum vs. frozen colostrum on immunoglobulin G (IgG) blood serum concentration was evaluated. Kids (n = 40) received the same management and IgG mass [3368 mg/kg of body weight (BW)] during the colostrum feeding period. The IgG in blood serum of kids from the lyophilized colostrum group was greater than that for kids that received frozen colostrum. The second experiment evaluated the effect of total IgG ingested by kids (n = 60) on IgG in blood serum during the colostrum feeding period. Three groups of animals received 3368, 1684, and 842 mg of IgG/kg of BW in 4 feedings for 2 d [high IgG concentration (H-IgG), medium IgG concentration (M-IgG), and low-IgG concentration (L-IgG), respectively]. The IgG blood serum in the kids that received H-IgG was greater than in the other 2 treatment groups, and no statistical differences were found for IgG in blood serum of kids that received either M-IgG or L-IgG. The third experiment evaluated the effect of timing of lyophilized colostrum meals on IgG blood serum concentration. Four groups of kids (n = 80) were used. Two groups received 1684 mg of IgG/kg of BW (higher level-1 d and higher level-2 d) and the other 2 groups received 842 mg of IgG/kg of BW (lower level-1 d and lower level-2 d). Two groups received 2 feedings in 1 d, and the other 2 groups received 4 feedings over a 2-d period, as denoted. Higher level-1 d kids had greater IgG blood serum concentration than the higher level-2 d kids, and no statistical differences were found between lower level-1 d and lower level-2 d kids.

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