Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005 Oct;17(10):1037-45.

Course of disease, drug treatment and health-related quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease 5 years after initial diagnosis.

Author information

1
Medical Department, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. tomm.bernklev@bluezone.no

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We assessed health-related quality of life (HRQOL) on the basis of a cross-sectional design in a population-based cohort of inflammatory bowel disease patients followed prospectively for 5 years after diagnosis. The aim was to investigate the influence of the course of disease, drug therapy, and relapse pattern on the patients' HRQOL.

METHODS:

All patients completed the validated Norwegian version of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (N-IBDQ). We present data from 497 patients, 328 with ulcerative colitis and 169 with Crohn's disease. The mean age was 43.3 years, and 48% were female.

RESULTS:

Crohn's disease patients treated with systemic steroids or azathioprine had a statistically significant reduction in the N-IBDQ total score compared with non-users. Patients with a more severe disease pattern had a lower N-IBDQ total score. Patients reporting a relapse during the observation period had a significantly lower total score and dimension scores than patients without relapse in both diagnostic groups, and likewise there was a statistically significant decrease in N-IBDQ total score for those with extra-intestinal manifestations compared with those without. A multiple linear regression model showed that the number of relapses during the preceding year in ulcerative colitis, and sex (female gender) in Crohn's disease were the strongest predictor of a reduction in N-IBDQ total score.

CONCLUSION:

Treatment with systemic steroids or immunosuppressive drugs, a relapsing disease and the presence of extra-intestinal manifestations were associated with a clinically significant reduction in the patients' HRQOL.

PMID:
16148548
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Support Center