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J Urol. 2005 Oct;174(4 Pt 1):1177-82.

Medical and surgical palliative care of patients with urological malignancies.

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1
Department of Urology, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, California 95817, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Urological malignancies are relatively common and patients often live many years with disease. There are many effective medical and surgical palliative treatments, although few comprehensive guidelines have been published. We reviewed the various palliative treatments available for the 3 most common urological malignancies, namely prostate cancer, bladder cancer and renal cancer.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A literature search of the last 15 years was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed. In addition, relevant journals were targeted for specific information related to this review. Our clinical experience was combined with the current literature to create guidelines for palliative care.

RESULTS:

Several effective treatments are available for the palliative care of patients with prostate, bladder or renal cancer. Options in palliative care are varied with regard to invasiveness, morbidity, risks and benefits. The algorithms described provide a framework to a sequential approach to achieving palliation. Urologists are central to initiating care and referrals to improve outcomes in these patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Palliative care includes disease directed treatment as well as functional, psychosocial and spiritual support. Disease directed therapy and palliative care should be provided simultaneously throughout illness. Improved quality of care and quality of life as well as physician satisfaction are frequent outcomes of this approach. Supportive care begins at initial diagnosis and it should be flexible to meet the changing needs of patients with cancer and their families.

PMID:
16145365
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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