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J Magn Reson Imaging. 2005 Oct;22(4):520-6.

Contrast-enhanced MRI of ductal carcinoma in situ: characteristics of a new intensity-modulated parametric mapping technique correlated with histopathologic findings.

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1
Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To identify morphologic and dynamic enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by using a new intensity-modulated parametric mapping technique, and to correlate the MRI features with histopathologic findings.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Fourteen patients with pure DCIS on pathology underwent conventional mammography and contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI using the intensity-modulated parametric mapping technique. The MR images were reviewed and the lesions were categorized according to morphologic and kinetic criteria from the ACR BI-RADS-MRI Lexicon, with BI-RADS 4 and 5 lesions classified as suspicious.

RESULTS:

With the use of a kinetic curve shape analysis, MRI classified seven of 14 lesions (50%) as suspicious, including four with initial-rapid/late-washout and three with initial-rapid/late-plateau. Using morphologic criteria, MRI classified 10/14 (71%) as suspicious, with the most prominent morphologic feature being a regional enhancement pattern. Using the intensity modulated parametric mapping technique, MRI classified 12/14 cases (86%) as suspicious. Parametric mapping identified all intermediate- and high-grade DCIS lesions.

CONCLUSION:

The intensity-modulated parametric mapping technique for breast MRI resulted in the highest detection rate for the DCIS cases. Furthermore, the parametric mapping technique identified all intermediate- and high-grade DCIS lesions, suggesting that a negative MRI using the parametric mapping technique may exclude intermediate- and high-grade DCIS. This finding has potential clinical implications.

PMID:
16142701
DOI:
10.1002/jmri.20405
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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