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Epidemiology. 2005 Sep;16(5):704-9.

Risk factors for work-related assaults on nurses.

Author information

1
Regional Injury Prevention Research Center and Center for Violence Prevention and Control, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. gerbe001@umn.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Work-related homicides have been the subject of considerable study, but little is known about nonfatal violence and relevant risk factors.

METHODS:

We surveyed 6300 Minnesota nurses who were selected randomly from the 1998 licensing database and determined their employment and occupational violence experience. In a nested case-control study, we examined environmental exposures and physical assault. Cases of assault in the previous 12 months and controls randomly selected from assault-free months were surveyed about prior-month exposures.

RESULTS:

After adjustment by multiple logistic regression, incidence of physical assault was 13.2 per 100 persons per year (95% confidence interval = 12.2-14.3). Among 310 cases and 946 control subjects, odds ratios for assault were increased: in nursing homes or long-term care facilities (2.6; 1.9-3.6), emergency departments (4.2; 1.3-12.8), and psychiatric departments (2.0; 1.1-3.7); in environments not "bright as daylight" (2.2; 1.6-2.8); and for each additional hour of shift duration (1.05; 0.99-1.11). Risks were decreased when carrying cellular telephones or personal alarms (0.3; 0.2-0.7).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results may guide in-depth investigation of ways protective and risk factors can control violence against nurses.

PMID:
16135952
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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