Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;187:209-20.

Substance use disorders and the orbitofrontal cortex: systematic review of behavioural decision-making and neuroimaging studies.

Author information

1
Psychiatric Centre Brothers Alexians, Boechout, Belgium. geert.dom@fracarita.org

Erratum in

  • Br J Psychiatry. 2005 Nov;187:490.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Orbitofrontal cortex dysfunctions have been frequently documented in people with substance use disorders. The exact role of this cortical region, however, remains unspecified.

AIMS:

To assess the functionality of the orbitofrontal cortex in people with substance use disorders.

METHOD:

Reports of studies using behavioural decision-making tasks and/or neuroimaging techniques to investigate orbitofrontal cortex functioning in cases of substance misuse were reviewed. Studies focusing exclusively on tobacco-smoking and gambling were excluded.

RESULTS:

Fifty-two research articles were evaluated. Most studies showed significant deficits in decision-making in people with substance use disorders. A consistent finding in the neuroimaging studies was hypoactivity of the orbitofrontal cortex after detoxification. The association between hyperactivity of this region and craving or cue reactivity was not consistent across studies.

CONCLUSIONS:

The orbitofrontal cortex has an important role in addictive behaviours. Further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying neuronal substrates of cue reactivity, craving and decision-making, and the implications for treatment and relapse prevention.

PMID:
16135857
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.187.3.209
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press
Loading ...
Support Center