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Surg Infect (Larchmt). 2005;6(2):185-95.

Surgical injury and metabolic stress enhance the virulence of the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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1
Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We have shown previously that the PA-I lectin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a key role in gut-derived sepsis during surgical stress. The aims of this study were to determine if the intestinal tract lumen of a stressed host contained soluble factors that could induce the expression of PA-I.

METHODS:

Mice were subjected to either 30% surgical hepatectomy or sham-laparotomy, and P. aeruginosa was introduced into the cecum. Twenty-four hours later, feces were recovered, and PA-I and exotoxin A were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In reiterative experiments, fecal filtrates from both hepatectomy and sham-operated mice were tested for their ability to induce PA-I expression in cultures of P. aeruginosa. Finally, the media from cultured human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells stressed with excess glutamine was tested for its ability to induce the expression of PA-I in cultures of P. aeruginosa.

RESULTS:

Both PA-I and exotoxin A mRNA were increased in vivo in the intestinal tract of mice subjected to 30% hepatectomy. Soluble fecal filtrates from hepatectomy mice induced PA-I in vitro. Media from epithelial cells exposed to excess glutamine alone induced PA-I expression.

CONCLUSIONS:

The intestinal environment of a stressed host contains soluble factors capable of inducing lethal virulence traits in human opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa.

PMID:
16128625
DOI:
10.1089/sur.2005.6.185
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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