Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Lung Cancer. 2005 Dec;50(3):285-90. Epub 2005 Aug 26.

Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphism and risk of lung cancer: a possible interaction with polymorphisms in the interleukin 1 beta gene.

Author information

1
Department of Toxicology, National Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 8149 Dep, N-0033 Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

Tobacco smoking is the main risk factor for lung cancer. Only 10-15% of smokers develop lung cancer, suggesting that genetic factors are of importance in determining individual susceptibility to the disease. Several studies in recent years indicate that chronic inflammation is a cofactor in lung carcinogenesis. We have previously reported an association of interleukin 1 beta gene (IL1B) polymorphisms with lung cancer risk. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) has been implicated in carcinogenesis of different cancer types. IL-1Ra binds competitively to the same membrane receptor as interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and thereby acts as an antagonist to the pro-inflammatory actions of IL-1beta. The aim of the study was to examine whether a common VNTR polymorphism in the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist gene (IL1RN) is associated with lung cancer risk. Due to the tight relationship between IL1RN and IL1B, we also explored the possibility of an interaction between the two genes. The study population comprised of 340 non-small cell lung cancer cases and 412 healthy controls of Norwegian origin. Our results indicate that individuals homozygous for the IL1RN*1 allele and carrying the IL1B-31T allele had increased risk of non-small cell lung cancer (odds ratio C/T 3.08; 1.10-8.62 and T/T 5.87; 2.15-16.05). Furthermore, IL1RN*1 carriers had nearly two-fold higher levels of bulky/hydrophobic DNA adducts in the lung. Our findings support the significance of IL1 gene cluster polymorphisms and risk of lung cancer.

PMID:
16126303
DOI:
10.1016/j.lungcan.2005.07.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center