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Pol Merkur Lekarski. 2005 Jun;18(108):657-62.

[Varicose veins of lower limbs is a very common medical problem in developed countries and also in Poland].

[Article in Polish]

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1
Zakład Pielegniarstwa Klinicznego i Rehabilitacyjnego Wydziału Nauk o Zdrowiu Pomorskiej AM w Szczecinie.

Abstract

Although surgery is the main therapeutic method applied for the treatment of this disease the other therapeutic modalities cannot be neglected. The aim of the study was an assessment of quality of life of patients following operative treatment of uncomplicated varicose veins with regard to applied additional therapy. The study included 100 patients of Swiebodzin district, who underwent surgery for uncomplicated varicose veins in last 6 years. These patients were visited and interviewed by trained nurse. There were four groups of patients defined. The first one received pharmacological therapy after surgery predominantly phlebotrophic agents, second one used compression therapy, third applied both methods, fourth used as controls did not get any additional therapy after surgery at all. As an investigation tool the original quality of life questionnaire CIVIQ was applied taking into account pain, psychological, physical and social aspects. Results revealed significantly better quality of life for patients using both pharmacological and compression therapy over ones applying one of these therapies alone and the group applying no therapy at all. Morbidity rate was 19%. Reintervention rate was 12% and on examinations in 72% varicose veins were seen. The majority of patients (57%) declared improvement of their health status, 10% substantial improvement 20% some improvement and 13% declared no improvement after surgery for varicose veins.

CONCLUSION:

Compression and phlebotrophic therapies applied together after surgery are simple an effective methods improving quality of life better than any of these methods applied separately or no additional therapy at all. Their use is still not very common in Poland.

PMID:
16124378
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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