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J Extra Corpor Technol. 2005 Jun;37(2):227-35.

General anesthesia in cardiac surgery: a review of drugs and practices.

Author information

1
Sarver Heart Center and Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85724, USA.

Abstract

General anesthesia is defined as complete anesthesia affecting the entire body with loss of consciousness, analgesia, amnesia, and muscle relaxation. There is a wide spectrum of agents able to partially or completely induce general anesthesia. Presently, there is not a single universally accepted technique for anesthetic management during cardiac surgery. Instead, the drugs and combinations of drugs used are derived from the pathophysiologic state of the patient and individual preference and experience of the anesthesiologist. According to the definition of general anesthesia, current practices consist of four main components: hypnosis, analgesia, amnesia, and muscle relaxation. Although many of the agents highlighted in this review are capable of producing more than one of these effects, it is logical that drugs producing these effects are given in combination to achieve the most beneficial effect. This review features a discussion of currently used anesthetic drugs and clinical practices of general anesthesia during cardiac surgery. The information in this particular review is derived from textbooks, current literature, and personal experience, and is designed as a general overview of anesthesia during cardiac surgery.

PMID:
16117465
PMCID:
PMC4682541
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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