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Osteoporos Int. 1992 Jul;2(4):168-73.

The effects of calcium supplementation and exercise on bone density in elderly Chinese women.

Author information

1
Department of Community and Family Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Abstract

A randomized controlled trial was carried out to determine whether calcium supplementation and load-bearing exercise can increase or maintain bone mass in the elderly. Fifty Chinese women, aged 62-92 years, living in a hostel for the elderly in Hong Kong were randomized to enter one of four treatment groups: (I) calcium supplementation of 800 mg (as calcium lactate gluconate) daily; (II) load-bearing exercise four times a week plus a daily placebo tablet; (III) calcium supplementation daily and load-bearing exercise four times a week; (IV) a placebo tablet daily. The interventions went on for 10 months. The bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at three sites in the hip (femoral neck, Ward's triangle and intertrochanteric area) and the L2-4 level of the spine. The percentage change in BMD in 10 months was used as the main outcome measurement. The parathyroid hormone level and indices of bone metabolism were also measured before and after 10 months of intervention. The BMD at Ward's triangle and the intertrochanteric area increased significantly in subjects on calcium supplement (p less than 0.05), but there was no significant change at the spine and femoral neck. Exercise had no effect on bone loss at any site. However, the results of two-way analysis of variance showed a significant joint effect of calcium supplements and exercise at the femoral neck (p less than 0.05), but not at the other sites. The parathyroid hormone levels fell significantly in subjects on calcium supplements (p less than 0.01). Calcium supplement in the form of calcium lactate gluconate was adequately absorbed in elderly Chinese women with a calcium intake of less than 300 mg per day. It was effective in reducing bone loss at the hip, and there may be interaction effects with exercise in maintaining bone density.

PMID:
1611221
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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