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Kidney Int. 2005 Sep;68(3):1130-6.

Immunohistochemical localization of apolipoprotein A-IV in human kidney tissue.

Author information

1
Division of Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Medical Genetics, Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Apolipoprotein A-IV (ApoA-IV) is a 46 kD glycoprotein thought to protect against atherosclerosis. It is synthesized primarily in epithelial cells of the small intestine. Elevated plasma concentrations of ApoA-IV in patients with chronic kidney disease suggest that the human kidney is involved in ApoA-IV metabolism.

METHODS:

To investigate whether the human kidney directly metabolizes ApoA-IV and which kidney tissue compartment is involved therein, ApoA-IV was localized by immunohistochemistry in 28 healthy kidney tissue samples obtained from patients undergoing nephrectomy. ApoA-IV mRNA expression was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to exclude de novo synthesis in the kidney.

RESULTS:

ApoA-IV immunostaining was detected in proximal and distal tubular cells, capillaries and blood vessels but not inside glomeruli. ApoA-IV was predominantly found in the brush border of proximal tubules and in intracellular granules and various plasma membrane domains of both proximal and distal tubules. mRNA expression analysis revealed that no ApoA-IV was produced in the kidney.

CONCLUSION:

The immunoreactivity of ApoA-IV observed in kidney tubular cells suggests a direct role of the human kidney in ApoA-IV metabolism. The granular staining pattern probably represents lysosomes degrading ApoA-IV. The additional ApoA-IV localization in distal tubules suggests a rescue function to reabsorb otherwise escaping ApoA-IV in case proximal tubules cannot reabsorb all ApoA-IV. Since no mRNA expression could be detected in any kidney cells, the observed ApoA-IV immunoreactivity represents uptake and not de novo synthesis of ApoA-IV.

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