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PLoS Genet. 2005 Jul;1(1):109-18. Epub 2005 Jul 25.

Diversity of flowering responses in wild Arabidopsis thaliana strains.

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1
Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany.

Abstract

Although multiple environmental cues regulate the transition to flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana, previous studies have suggested that wild A. thaliana accessions fall primarily into two classes, distinguished by their requirement for vernalization (extended winter-like temperatures), which enables rapid flowering under long days. Much of the difference in vernalization response is apparently due to variation at two epistatically acting loci, FRI and FLC. We present the response of over 150 wild accessions to three different environmental variables. In long days, FLC is among those genes whose expression is most highly correlated with flowering. In short days, FRI and FLC are less important, although their contribution is still significant. In addition, there is considerable variation not only in vernalization response, but also in the response to differences in day length or ambient growth temperature. The identification of accessions that flower relatively early or late in specific environments suggests that many of the flowering-time pathways identified by mutagenesis, such as those that respond to day length, contribute to flowering-time variation in the wild. In contrast to differences in vernalization requirement, which are mainly mediated by FRI and FLC, it seems that variation in these other pathways is due to allelic effects at several different loci.

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