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Dev Biol. 2005 Sep 15;285(2):340-57.

Neuromuscular synaptogenesis in wild-type and mutant zebrafish.

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1
Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 215 Stemmler Hall, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6074, USA.

Abstract

Genetic screens for synaptogenesis mutants have been performed in many organisms, but few if any have simultaneously screened for defects in pre- and postsynaptic specializations. Here, we report the results of a small-scale genetic screen, the first in vertebrates, for defects in synaptogenesis. Using zebrafish as a model system, we identified seven mutants that affect different aspects of neuromuscular synapse formation. Many of these mutant phenotypes have not been previously reported in zebrafish and are distinct from those described in other organisms. Characterization of mutant and wild-type zebrafish, from the time that motor axons first arrive at target muscles through adulthood, has provided the new information about the cellular events that occur during neuromuscular synaptogenesis. These include insights into the formation and dispersal of prepatterned AChR clusters, the relationship between motor axon elongation and synapse size, and the development of precise appositions between presynaptic clusters of synaptic vesicles in nerve terminals and postsynaptic receptor clusters. In addition, we show that the mechanisms underlying synapse formation within the myotomal muscle itself are largely independent of those that underlie synapse formation at myotendinous junctions and that the outgrowth of secondary motor axons requires at least one cue not necessary for the outgrowth of primary motor axons, while other cues are required for both. One-third of the mutants identified in this screen did not have impaired motility, suggesting that many genes involved in neuromuscular synaptogenesis were missed in large scale motility-based screens. Identification of the underlying genetic defects in these mutants will extend our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation and function of neuromuscular and other synapses.

PMID:
16102744
DOI:
10.1016/j.ydbio.2005.06.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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