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Stroke. 2005 Sep;36(9):e80-2. Epub 2005 Aug 11.

Progressive symptomatic carotid dissection treated with multiple stents.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection remains a major cause of stroke in the young. Although systemic anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy allow healing of the dissection in most patients, medical treatment can fail or be contraindicated. In selected cases of carotid dissections, the use of endovascular stent-assisted angioplasty has been reported to permit reconstruction of the extracranial ICA.

METHODS:

We report a case of symptomatic spontaneous carotid dissection which progressively extended from the cervical to the supraclinoid segments of the ICA in a 48-year-old patient under anticoagulant therapy. Because of failed medical therapy and further transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), the patient was treated by 5 tandem stents deployed in an overlapping fashion from the terminal ICA to the cervical segment.

RESULTS:

Postprocedure angiography demonstrated reconstitution of the luminal diameter of the ICA. The patient progressively improved and no further TIAs were observed. At 8-month follow-up, the vessel remained patent with a slight intra-extracranial reduction in size suggesting myointimal hyperplasia. Neurological exam was normal.

CONCLUSIONS:

The successful angiographic and clinical results observed in our case of intra-extracranial stenting of a long dissection contributes to the literature of carotid dissection treated with multiple stents. The excellent mid-term follow-up in our patient confirms the efficacy of this treatment and good tolerance to multiple stents. To our knowledge this is the first case of spontaneous dissection treated with stenting including the distal supraclinoid segment, through an extensive proximally dissected artery.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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