Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2005 Jun;15(3):497-509.

Phenomenology and diagnostic stability of youths with atypical psychotic symptoms.

Author information

1
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to better characterize the phenomenology and diagnostic stability of youths that report atypical psychotic symptoms.

METHOD:

In a 2-year longitudinal follow-up study, youths reporting atypical psychotic symptoms (n = 20) were compared with youths with schizophrenia (n = 27) and youths with bipolar disorder with psychotic features (n = 22) on psychotic, dissociative, and general symptomatology, comorbid diagnoses, previous abuse, and overall functioning. Diagnoses were obtained using structured diagnostic interviews (i.e., the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents).

RESULTS:

None of the subjects reporting atypical psychotic symptoms went on to develop a classic psychotic illness by the year 2 follow-up. These subjects had significantly higher rates of abuse and dissociative symptoms, and were significantly more likely to receive a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or a depressive disorder than youths with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings suggest that youths with atypical, fleeting, or situationally specific hallucinations are more likely to have a mood or anxiety disorder (such as PTSD) than a current or prodromal psychotic illness.

PMID:
16092913
DOI:
10.1089/cap.2005.15.497
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Support Center