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Br J Pharmacol. 2005 Oct;146(4):514-24.

Induction of central signalling pathways and select functional effects in human platelets by beta-boswellic acid.

Author information

1
Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Frankfurt, Marie-Curie-Str. 9, Frankfurt D-60439, Germany.

Abstract

We have recently shown that in polymorphonuclear leukocytes, 11-keto boswellic acids (KBAs) induce Ca2+ mobilisation and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Here we addressed the effects of BAs on central signalling pathways in human platelets and on various platelet functions. We found that beta-BA (10 microM), the 11-methylene analogue of KBA, caused a pronounced mobilisation of Ca2+ from internal stores and induced the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)2, and Akt. These effects of beta-BA were concentration dependent, and the magnitude of the responses was comparable to those obtained after platelet stimulation with thrombin or collagen. Based on inhibitor studies, beta-BA triggers Ca2+ mobilisation via the phospholipase (PL)C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway, and involves Src family kinase signalling. Investigation of platelet functions revealed that beta-BA (> or =10 microM) strongly stimulates the platelet-induced generation of thrombin in an ex-vivo in-vitro model, the liberation of arachidonic acid (AA), and induces platelet aggregation in a Ca2+-dependent manner. In contrast to beta-BA, the 11-keto-BAs (KBA or AKBA) evoke only moderate Ca2+ mobilisation and activate p38 MAPK, but fail to induce phosphorylation of ERK2 or Akt, and do not cause aggregation or significant generation of thrombin. In summary, beta-BA potently induces Ca2+ mobilisation as well as the activation of pivotal protein kinases, and elicits functional platelet responses such as thrombin generation, liberation of AA, and aggregation.

PMID:
16086030
PMCID:
PMC1751190
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjp.0706366
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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