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Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Aug 15;53(4):585-92.

Perceived self-efficacy gained from, and health effects of, a rehabilitation program after hip joint replacement.

Author information

1
Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. birte.dohnke@charite.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether a routine multidisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation program can increase patient self-efficacy, and to investigate the effects of high self-efficacy at admission, and increases in self-efficacy, on health changes in patients who undergo such rehabilitation after hip joint replacement.

METHODS:

Participants in this longitudinal study were 1,065 patients who underwent inpatient rehabilitation after hip joint replacement. Questionnaires were administered at admission, discharge, and 6-month followup. The main outcome variables were disability, pain, depressive symptomatology, and self-efficacy to cope with disability and pain.

RESULTS:

Significant improvements from admission to discharge from the inpatient rehabilitation program in disability, pain, depressive symptoms, and self-efficacy were found. In addition, higher levels of self-efficacy at admission and larger increases in self-efficacy over the course of the program predicted larger health changes (i.e., greater decreases in disability, pain, and depressive symptoms). Results were generally similar for health changes from discharge to 6-month followup.

CONCLUSION:

A routine multidisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation program after hip joint replacement can result in enhanced self-efficacy.

PMID:
16082655
DOI:
10.1002/art.21324
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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