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Obes Res. 2005 Jul;13(7):1175-9.

Obstructive sleep apnea in extremely overweight adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. maninder.kalra@cchmc.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in extremely overweight adolescents and to examine the effect of significant weight loss on OSA severity.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

We reviewed the anthropometric and polysomnographic data on all extremely overweight adolescents who underwent laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from July 2001 to September 2004. Repeat polysomnograms were performed after significant weight loss. Comparisons were made between pre- and postoperative polysomnographic data.

RESULTS:

Nineteen of 34 patients (55%) who underwent bariatric surgery were diagnosed with OSA. Subsequent to surgery, 10 of these patients returned for follow-up polysomnographic testing. After significant weight loss (mean, 58 kg), OSA severity markedly decreased in all patients (median apnea-hypopnea index at baseline vs. after weight loss, 9.1 vs. 0.65).

DISCUSSION:

Our study indicated that OSA was highly prevalent in extremely overweight adolescents meeting eligibility criteria for bariatric surgery. The significant weight loss after gastric bypass was associated with a marked reduction in OSA severity.

PMID:
16076986
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2005.139
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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