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Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2005 Aug;63(2):185-90.

Final height after treatment of early puberty in short adopted girls with gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist with or without growth hormone.

Author information

1
Erasmus MC/Sophia Children's Hospital, Subdivision of Endocrinology, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. d.mul@erasmusmc.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare final height data after treatment with gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) alone or in combination with growth hormone (GH) in short adopted girls with early puberty.

DESIGN:

A randomized controlled trial.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Twenty-six girls with onset of puberty before 10 years of age were treated for 3 years with either GnRHa alone (group A, n = 12) or with GnRHa and GH (group B, n = 14). Mean age at start of treatment was 9.6 years in both groups, bone age was 10.7 (SD 1.1) years in group A and 11.6 (0.8) years in group B.

RESULTS:

Initial height prediction with average Bayley & Pinneau tables was 149.8 (5.6) and 146.8 (4.8) cm, respectively. Bone age at discontinuation of treatment was 12.3 (0.9) and 13.0 (0.6) years in group A and B, respectively. Height gain defined as the difference between initial height prediction and attained final height, was significantly different between group A and B (5.2 (3.7) and 8.2 (3.4) cm, P < 0.05) using average tables for height prediction. With accelerated tables for prediction the numbers were -1.0 (3.6) and 3.3 (3.5) cm, respectively. At final height, there was no significant difference in height: group A: 155.0 (5.6) cm and group B: 155.0 (5.5) cm.

CONCLUSIONS:

After 3 years of GnRHa treatment in adopted girls with early puberty, FH is significantly higher than initial height prediction. The addition of GH resulted in a limited further increase in height gain. In the interpretation of the results methodological issues concerning height prediction have to be taken into account.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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