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Ann Bot. 2005 Sep;96(4):507-18. Epub 2005 Jul 28.

Sensing and signalling in response to oxygen deprivation in plants and other organisms.

Author information

1
Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0124, USA. serres@ucr.edu

Abstract

AIMS AND SCOPE:

All aerobic organisms require molecular di-oxygen (O2) for efficient production of ATP though oxidative phosphorylation. Cellular depletion of oxygen results in rapid molecular and physiological acclimation. The purpose of this review is to consider the processes of low oxygen sensing and response in diverse organisms, with special consideration of plant cells.

CONCLUSIONS:

The sensing of oxygen deprivation in bacteria, fungi, metazoa and plants involves multiple sensors and signal transduction pathways. Cellular responses result in a reprogramming of gene expression and metabolic processes that enhance transient survival and can enable long-term tolerance to sub-optimal oxygen levels. The mechanism of sensing can involve molecules that directly bind or react with oxygen (direct sensing), or recognition of altered cellular homeostasis (indirect sensing). The growing knowledge of the activation of genes in response to oxygen deprivation has provided additional information on the response and acclimation processes. Conservation of calcium fluxes and reactive oxygen species as second messengers in signal transduction pathways in metazoa and plants may reflect the elemental importance of rapid sensing of cellular restriction in oxygen by aerobic organisms.

PMID:
16051633
PMCID:
PMC4247021
DOI:
10.1093/aob/mci206
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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