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Aust J Rural Health. 2005 Aug;13(4):242-6.

The diabetes experiences of Aboriginal people living in a rural Canadian community.

Author information

1
Nursing Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Canada. bartons@unbc.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To optimise participation with Aboriginal people by sharing experiences of living with the challenges of diabetes in rural south-western Canada, and how these could be addressed.

DESIGN:

Qualitative content analysis of semi-structured and conversational interviews.

SETTING:

Diabetes health services in the Bella Coola Valley, British Columbia, Canada.

SUBJECTS:

Eight Nuxalk Nation participants, five women and three men, living with type 2 diabetes, were interviewed. Four of these participants, three women and one man, were engaged in six follow-up conversational interviews.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The descriptive research explored experiences of Nuxalk people living with the challenges of diabetes, and how these could inform diabetes health services in culturally specific ways.

RESULTS:

Challenges included understanding the connections between (i) diabetes and western or traditional medicines; (ii) dietary changes, exercise and weight loss; (iii) how health professionals communicate and the relevance of what is said; (iv) having many life choices and the responsibility to choose; and (v) a belief in living day by day and an awareness of life cycles that may need to be broken.

CONCLUSION:

The study substantiated the fundamental necessity for diabetes health services to be inclusive of Aboriginal perspectives.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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