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Sex Transm Dis. 2005 Aug;32(8):513-5.

Accounting for failures may improve precision: evidence supporting improved validity of self-reported condom use.

Author information

1
College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0003, USA. crosby@uky.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether a measure of unprotected vaginal sex that is adjusted for condom failures would produce improved accuracy in predicting biologically confirmed STDs (chlamydia and gonorrhea) among female teens.

METHODS:

Self-reported measures were collected using audio-computer-assisted self-interviewing. DNA amplification for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae was conducted.

RESULTS:

The unadjusted measure of unprotected vaginal sex was not significantly associated with biologically confirmed prevalence of STDs (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.51; 95% CI = 0.71-3.21; P = 0.28). Alternatively, the adjusted measure achieved significance (PR = 3.59; 95% CI = 1.13-11.38; P = 0.014). More than one quarter (25.6%) of teens using condoms inconsistently and/or incorrectly tested positive for an STD compared to 7.1% among those reporting the consistent and correct use of condoms.

CONCLUSION:

Findings demonstrate that studies of condom effectiveness should use an adjusted measure of condom use to achieve precision and rigor.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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