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J Rehabil Med. 2005 May;37(3):189-91.

Comparison of disordered swallowing patterns in patients with recurrent cortical/subcortical stroke and first-time brainstem stroke.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 100, Taiwan, ROC.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the disordered swallowing patterns in recurrent cortical/subcortical stroke and first-time brainstem stroke.

DESIGN:

A retrospective study.

SUBJECTS:

Forty-seven consecutive patients, 28 with recurrent cortical/subcortical stroke and 19 with first-time brainstem stroke, referred for dysphagic evaluation to the rehabilitation department of a medical centre.

METHODS:

Thirty-five male and 12 female patients with a mean age of 62.0+/-11.5 years were included. The median post-stroke duration was 17.0 days. The records of clinical examination and a videofluoroscopic study of swallowing were collected through chart review. The percentages of abnormalities seen at clinical examination and videofluoroscopic swallowing study between recurrent cortical/subcortical stroke and first-time brainstem stroke patients were compared using a chi-square test.

RESULTS:

The recurrent cortical/subcortical patients suffered from a higher rate of impaired tongue movement, drooling and aphasia at clinical examination and a higher percentage of swallowing abnormalities in oral-preparatory and oral phases in the videofluoroscopic swallowing study. The abnormal videofluoroscopic findings in first-time brainstem stroke patients predominantly occurred in the pharyngeal phase. Both groups had more difficulties swallowing thin barium than they did swallowing the thick and paste barium.

CONCLUSION:

The recurrent cortical/subcortical stroke and first-time brainstem stroke patients show different manifestations in some parameters of both clinical examination and videofluoroscopic swallowing study.

PMID:
16040477
DOI:
10.1080/16501970410024163
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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