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J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2005 Jul-Aug;12(4):343-6.

Directed laparoscopic cryomyolysis for symptomatic leiomyomata: one-year follow up.

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1
Department of Gynecology, Tor Vergata University of Rome, Italy. ezupi@libero.it

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of laparoscopic cryomyolysis as a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of symptomatic uterine myomas in menstruating women.

DESIGN:

Open, one-arm pilot study (Canadian Task Force classification II).

SETTING:

University-affiliated public hospital.

PATIENTS:

Twenty patients with symptomatic uterine myomas were treated with directed cryomyolysis. All had reported abnormal bleeding and/or pelvic pain/pressure and/or urinary frequency. Myoma diameters varied from 4 to 10 cm.

INTERVENTION:

One-year follow-up after laparoscopic-directed cryomyolysis.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Laparoscopic cryomyolysis was performed using the Her Option Cryoablation Unit (American Medical Systems, Minneapolis, MN). Patients were evaluated 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after surgery. Power color Doppler ultrasound was performed preoperatively and postoperatively to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique in reducing or eliminating the primary blood supply to the myomas, as well documenting regression of the myomas. All patients reported a high rate of satisfaction with the treatment including absence of symptoms 12 months after surgery, with no bleeding and no myoma-related symptoms, comparable with patients who underwent hysterectomy. Mean shrinkage of myoma volume increased until 9 months after surgery (59.5% +/- 13.2%), reaching a steady mean-volume reduction of approximately 60% (61.9% +/- 11.9%) 12 months after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS:

Directed laparoscopic cryomyolysis appears to be an effective and safe technique for providing rapid symptom relief and at least 12 months' effectiveness in the treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomas.

PMID:
16036195
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmig.2005.05.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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