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J Pediatr Surg. 2005 Jul;40(7):1138-45.

Colonic manometry via appendicostomy shows reduced frequency, amplitude, and length of propagating sequences in children with slow-transit constipation.

Author information

1
Department of Surgical Research, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE:

We wish to define colonic motor function in children with slow-transit constipation (STC) using manometry catheters introduced through appendiceal stomas, previously sited for controlling fecal retention by colonic irrigation.

METHODS:

We undertook 24-hour pancolonic manometry of 6 children (5 boys; mean, 11.5 years; SD, 3.0) using a multilumen silastic catheter.

RESULTS:

were compared to nasocolonic motility studies obtained in healthy young adults.

RESULTS:

Antegrade propagating sequences (APSs) originated less frequently in the cecum compared to controls. There were fewer APS (mean +/- SEM: STC, 13 +/- 6 per 24 hours; controls, 52 +/- 6 per 24 hours; P < .01) and high-amplitude propagating contractions (HAPCs: STC, 5 +/- 2 per 24 hours; controls, 9.9 +/- 1.4 per 24 hours; P < .05). The amplitude of APS and HAPC was less in STC (APS, 39 +/- 9 mm Hg; controls, 54 +/- 3 per 24 hours; P < .05) (HAPC: STC, 94 +/- 10 mm Hg; control, 117 +/- 3 mm Hg; P < .01), whereas the amplitude of retrograde propagating sequences was greater in STC (43 +/- 6 mm Hg; control, 27 +/- 1 mm Hg; P < .01). The distances propagated by HAPC were significantly less in STC (36 +/- 4.5 vs 47 +/- 2.3 cm, controls; P < .05), and there was no evidence of a region-specific difference in propagation velocity of APS. Neither meal ingestion nor waking significantly increased colonic motor activity in patients with STC.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite the small numbers available to be studied, we found that children with STC in whom an appendicostomy had been placed show significant abnormalities in pancolonic motor function.

PMID:
16034759
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2005.03.047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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