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Nat Rev Microbiol. 2005 Aug;3(8):611-20.

Going against the grain: chemotaxis and infection in Vibrio cholerae.

Author information

1
Tufts University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.

Abstract

Chemotaxis is the process by which motile cells move in a biased manner both towards favourable and away from unfavourable environments. The requirement of this process for infection has been examined in several bacterial pathogens, including Vibrio cholerae. The single polar flagellum of Vibrio species is powered by a sodium-motive force across the inner membrane, and can rotate to produce speeds of up to 60 cell-body lengths (approximately 60microm) per second. Investigating the role of the chemotactic control of rapid flagellar motility during V. cholerae infection has revealed some unexpected and intriguing results.

PMID:
16012515
PMCID:
PMC2799996
DOI:
10.1038/nrmicro1207
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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