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Int J Dev Neurosci. 2005 Oct;23(6):501-7.

Age-related oxidative protein damages in central nervous system of rats: modulatory role of grape seed extract.

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  • 1Department of Medical Biochemistry, Dr. ALM Post Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Taramani Campus, Chennai 600113, India.


Oxidative stress has been shown to play a major role in aging and in neurodegenerative disorders. Protein modification is one of the important consequences of oxidative stress. In the present study, we evaluated the role of grape seed extract on memory, reactive oxygen species production, protein carbonyls (PCO), and thiol status in discrete regions of central nervous system of young and aged rats. Male albino rats of Wistar strain were divided into four groups: Group I--control young rats, Group II--young rats treated with grape seed extract (100 mg/kg BW) for 30 days, Group III--aged control rats and Group IV-aged rats supplemented with grape seed extract (100 mg/kg BW) for 30 days. Memory loss was observed in the aged rats. Age associated increase in reactive oxygen species production and protein oxidation was observed in the spinal cord; cerebral cortex, striatum and the hippocampus regions of aged rats (Group III). The levels of total thiol, non-protein thiol, protein thiols were found to be significantly decreased in spinal cord and all the brain regions studied in aged rats when compared to young rats. Supplementation of aged rats with grape seed extract showed increased memory performance and declined reactive oxygen species production, decreased protein carbonyl levels and improved thiol levels. These findings demonstrated that grape seed extract enhanced the antioxidant status and decreased the incidence of free radical induced protein oxidation in aged rats thereby protecting the central nervous system from the reactive oxygen species.

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