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Behav Res Ther. 2005 Sep;43(9):1173-85.

Thought suppression mediates the relationship between negative affect and borderline personality disorder symptoms.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, 2213 Elba Street, Box 3026, Durham, NC 27710, USA. rosen025@mc.duke.edu

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among negative affect, childhood sexual abuse (CSA), thought suppression, and diagnostic symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in a community sample (n=127). Findings suggest that the temperamental variable negative affect intensity/reactivity was a stronger predictor of BPD symptoms than CSA. In addition, results indicated that higher thought suppression mediated the relationship between negative affective intensity/reactivity and BPD symptoms, after controlling for a history of CSA. Overall, findings suggest that (a) negative affectivity may be a better predictor of BPD symptoms than CSA, and (b) chronic efforts to suppress unpleasant thoughts may be a regulation strategy underlying the relationship between intense negative emotions and BPD symptoms.

PMID:
16005704
DOI:
10.1016/j.brat.2004.08.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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