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South Med J. 2005 Jun;98(6):590-5.

Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy for infections with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus.

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1
Ochsner Clinic Foundation, Section on Infectious Diseases, New Orleans, LA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

As increasing numbers of patients are being treated with outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT), it becomes ever more important to ascertain the risks and benefits of such treatment for patients.

METHODS:

We conducted a retrospective analysis of 1,515 patients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infections who were treated with outpatient parenteral antimicrobial monotherapy. All patients were included in the adverse drug reaction analysis; 1,252 were evaluable for purposes of evaluating treatment efficacy.

RESULTS:

The six antibiotics most frequently used in this study (ceftriaxone, cefazolin, vancomycin, oxacillin, nafcillin, and clindamycin) appeared to be equivalent in achieving the desired efficacy outcome.

CONCLUSIONS:

Vancomycin was associated with a significantly greater number of side effects than was ceftriaxone, cefazolin, or oxacillin, and nafcillin was associated with a significantly greater number of adverse events than ceftriaxone.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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